7 Benefits Of Living A Nomadic Life

nomadic family

What was once called “motorhoming” and was reserved for retirees is becoming known as “nomadic living.” While nomads have been prominent throughout history, our modern society has become almost entirely stationary. A revival of this ancient and respected way of living is emerging once again. Nomadic living is becoming increasingly popular with each passing day. According to the Economist, a nomadic living has emerged due to new technology that enables alternative types of income. From artists to techies, people are discovering the benefits of life on the road. It’s easy to see why after reviewing the below seven benefits of living a nomadic life.

The Many Benefits of Being Nomadic

The nomadic life takes many forms. Some will be jetsetters, others will be backpackers and some will be RV-ers. The below benefits are available to every type of nomad.

1. Clutter-free Life

Owning a home naturally lends itself to clutter. You have so much room, why not fill it? Nomadic life removes all this space and leaves you with the bare essentials. Backpackers trim their belongings down to what they can fit in their packs; and RV-ers must limit their possessions to what can fit in their RV. While your new RV is spacious and roomy, you will think twice about loading up your old treadmill.

2. Cheaper Living

Removing a rent or mortgage payment frees up a large amount of cash. While living on the road can make holding a traditional job difficult, many nomads are turning to the Internet to fund their journeys. You may also be able to get work from town-to-town. Bear in mind that the nomadic life has its own expenses. For example, nomads who live in a RV must continually fuel their home, find campsites and pay for insurance.

3. The Ability to Live and Visit Anywhere

A nomad experiences the ultimate in geographical freedom. This is one of the most attractive benefits of nomadic living. You can follow every inclination and desire you have. Want to see the Grand Canyon? Plot a course. Need to get your feet in the sand? Head for the coast. Nomads can follow their fantasies and make them reality.

4. It’s Easy to Stay in Touch

In previous generations, embarking on a nomadic life meant saying a long goodbye to your friends and family. Now, as long as you have a laptop, you can stay connected with everyone you know. Thanks to social networking and webcam chat services, you can regularly communicate with your loved ones – and even have face-to-face conversations.

5. Discover New Cultures

According to a study by the Kellogg School of Management, those who have lived abroad or nomadic lifestyles were consistently more creative and able to think outside the box. Exposing yourself to new cultures can do wonders for your mental acuity by learning new ways of thought, traditions and morals.

6. A Cohesive Family Unit

Being a nomad with a family is not only possible, but also desirable. Nomadic families are together every minute of every day. It creates close bonds and a singular family unit. In a traditional lifestyle, one or both parents will be away the majority of the day. Nomadic living takes this away and replaces it with constant contact.

7. Minimal Needs

Travelers have very basic needs: food, shelter and water. If you are backpacking, these three will consistently be in mind. Fortunately, they will also be easily met. Depending on where the road takes you, meeting these basic human needs is typically an easy task. Those who have chosen to live out of a conversion van or other type of RV will have different needs: fuel, insurance and campsites. Regardless of which type of nomad you are, you will have far less needs than a homeowner.

You, Too, Can Be Nomadic

Transitioning into a nomadic lifestyle is a careful process and warrants thorough consideration. However, should you decide to embark on this lifestyle based on freedom and exploration there are many benefits awaiting you. Everyone can lead a nomadic lifestyle; start planning now to lead yours.

Jason Allen is a contributing writer and full-time nomad. He left a corporate job at a young age to travel the world. Jason hopes to publish books aimed at helping people find freedom in nomadic living. This post was made possible by our sponsors. 

13 Comments

    1. Very true! Plus, you don’t really have to worry about losing anything or getting anything stolen if you don’t have much to lose. 🙂

  1. I’ve always dreamed of being able to move around and whatnot. This post has some good points to consider and I’m gonna start saving up for this so I can cross it off my bucket list.

  2. Technology has definitely enabled a new revolution of digital nomads who can live and work anywhere there is internet. We’ll see a continuing rise in virtual workforce and lifestyle businesses.

  3. Great post and one I could DEFINITELY relate to. These were all things I noticed when we left the UK for Canada. We still have property back home so we haven’t cut all ties – this means we rent here and “live with less”, we don’t need lamps etc. that won’t work if we change location again. Plus, it’s brought us closer together as a family – we now have our own traditions and ways of doing things, a more defined family identity.

    1. Ah, that’s great to hear! 🙂 I think most people are just afraid but once you do it you realize it’s such a great experience!

  4. I think the nomadic family is a great option for my family. We have been struggling to communicate recently, and embarking on an adventure together in an RV could bring us much closer together.

  5. I’ve always romanticized a life on the road, this article actually makes it sound doable. I like the practical tips, going to bookmark this one and hope to set out for an adventure soon.

  6. I like Aisha’s thoughts! Living with less, but always knowing you have a home to go back to is a relief from the potential anxiety it causes you.

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